Compiling Mono 3.x from Source with LLVM Code Generation in Ubuntu LTS x64

The packages for Mono in Debian and Ubuntu are lagging far behind what is available from Xamarin for OS X, SUSE and OpenSUSE. The 2.10.x versions of Mono are .NET 2.0 runtime compatible and use Mono’s older Boem garbage collector — which tends to leak objects. The new generational “sgen” garbage collector is far superior All of the tutorials for building on Fedora/RHEL/CentOS and Debian/Ubuntu that I have seen build with the built-in code generation engine rather than LLVM. LLVM provides a significant speedup in the generated code of 20-30% but Mono can’t link against the version of LLVM that ships in Debian Wheezy or Ubuntu. You have to build a tweaked version from source — which is the tricky bit.

My goal was to build the same version of Mono that is shipped by Xamarin for OS X on Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin, including LLVM. That is mono 3.2.5 at the time of this writing.

Screen Shot 2013 12 01 at 10 58 51 AMPrerequisites

Mono is hosted on GitHub so we need git. It also requires GNU autotools, make and g++ to drive the build. 

sudo apt-get install libtool autoconf g++ gettext make git

We’re building something that isn’t managed by the system package manager, so according to the UNIX Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, the build product should go into the /opt file system. I’m going to use /opt/local and so before going any further let’s add that to the $PATH by editing /etc/environment with vi or your editor of choice:

PATH=“/opt/local/sbin:/opt/local/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/games”

Also, we need to change the current environment:

export PATH=/opt/local/sbin:/opt/local/bin:$PATH

Libgdiplus

The first component of Mono that we need to build from source is libgdiplus. Libgdiplus is an open source implementation of the Windows GDI+ API for graphics and text rendering. Libgdiplus has a number of prerequisites because it basically just maps GDI+ function calls onto equivalent Linux libraries:

sudo apt-get install pkg-config libglib2.0-dev libpng12-dev libx11-dev libfreetype6-dev libfontconfig1-dev libtiff-dev libjpeg8-dev libgif-dev libexif-dev

mkdir ~/src; mdkr ~/src/mono; cd ~/src/mono

git clone https://github.com/mono/libgdiplus.git

cd libgdiplus

./autogen.sh –prefix=/opt/local

make

sudo make install

 

Mono-LLVM

Mono has a tweaked fork of LLVM. By default it will try to build x86 and x86_64 targets on Ubuntu x64 but the build will fail because there is no x86 runtime support installed.

cd ~/src/mono

git clone https://github.com/mono/llvm.git

cd llvm

git checkout mono

./configure –prefix=/opt/local –enable-optimized –enable-targets=x86_64

make

sudo make install

Mono with LLVM

Each official release of Mono is tagged in git. You should checkout the version that you want to build. In this case, I’m building Mono 3.2.5 with the LLVM and libgdiplus libraries we already built. Since there is no working version of Mono on the system, the very first time you build you need to do make get-monolite-latest which will pull down a minimal mono-based C# compiler to boostrap the build.

cd ~/src/mono

git clone https://github.com/mono/mono.git

cd mono

git checkout mono-3.2.5

export MONO_USE_LLVM=1

./configure –prefix=/opt/local –prefix=/opt/local –enable-llvm=yes –with-sgen=yes –with-gc=sgen

make get-monolite-latest

make

sudo make install

Assuming that all went well, you should now have a working build of mono 3.2.5 (or newer) in /opt/local/bin/ and executing mono –version should include LLVM: yes.

Depending on what you want to do with Mono, you may now want to build XSP (ASP.NET server, Apache module and FastCGI module for nginx) and/or F# 3.x.

XSP

The xsp2 server uses a .NET Framework 2.0/3.0/3.5 API and the xsp4 server provides a 4/4.5 API. The main tweak here is to set the PKG_CONFIG_PATH environmental variable so that the configure script can find mono in /opt/local.

cd ~/src/mono

git clone https://github.com/mono/xsp.git

cd xsp

git checkout 3.0.11

PKG_CONFIG_PATH=/opt/local/lib/pkgconfig ./autogen.sh –prefix=/opt/local

make

sudo make install

F# 3.1

cd ~/src/mono

git clone https://github.com/fsharp/fsharp

cd fsharp

git checkout fsharp_31

./autogen.sh –prefix=/opt/local

make

sudo make install

Solving Very Slow Visual Studio Build Times in VMWare

ClockIn 2009, we chose 15″ MacBook Pro BTO over Dell, HP and Lenovo offerings. Apple offered us the best hardware and equivalent lease terms but with much simpler servicing done by ETF rather than (often incorrect) paper statements and checks. 99% of the time we ran this MacBooks with Windows 7 under Boot Camp. When I started doing some iOS development, I ran Snow Leopard and Xcode under VirtualBox and when I got fed up with the flakiness, I used VMware Workstation. OS X didn’t run very well under virtualization mostly because accelerated Quartz Extreme drivers don’t exist for VMware Workstation. Still, it actually worked well enough and was much more convenient than dual booting — which is such a huge time suck. When the lease period ended, we renewed with Apple and decided to just use OS X as the host environment for a variety of reasons:

The transition went very smoothly. I was using a VM with Windows Server 2008 and Visual Studio 2010 for primary .NET web development. Configuring IIS Express to serve outside of localhost bound to a host-only adapter is great for cross-browser testing, but it can be even more useful to enable remote access to Fiddler and point external browsers to the Fiddler proxy running in the VM to get both client debugging and HTTP sniffing at the same time. All of this was working out great.
 
At the start of October I downloaded Windows Server 2012 and Visual Studio 2012 and created a new development VM. In order to minimize disk storage, I moved my source tree to a folder in the host OS X environment and exposed it via the “Shared Folders” feature of VMWare Fusion 5.x to Windows. At the same time I started working on a new project.

 

The Slowening

Once the project grew to 20, 30 and 50k lines of C# code, the build times started to become horrifically slow. When combined with running unit tests, build became a big time for a bathroom break or cup of coffee event like building a project in C 15 years ago. Builds would show cdc.exe running at ~50% CPU (e.g. 1 core) and some other stuff totaling ~70% CPU. The VM was not memory bound and network IO was minimal. This was my first substantial project using Code First EF, so I thought maybe the complex object graph is just hard for the C# compiler to deal with.
 
After a few weeks of increasingly painful build times, I was looking at breaking my solution up so that I could build against pre-compiled DLLs — anything to make it go faster. I ran across a post on SuperUser:

… (Full disclosure: I work on VMware Fusion.)

I have heard that storing the code on a “network” drive (either an HGFS share or an NFS/CIFS share on the host, accessed via a virtual ethernet device) is a bad idea. Apparently the build performance is pretty bad in this configuration.

Oh really? Hmmm. Maybe it isn’t that my class libraries are so complex but something else is going on. Here are some empirical measurements of rebuild time of an actual solution:

VMWare shared folder: 	50 sec
OS X SMB share: 	18 sec
within virtual disk:	 9 sec

Wow. Problem solved. Incremental builds are basically instantaneous and a full rebuild takes 9 seconds when the code is hosted inside the VM image. Not only does hosting the source code within the VM virtual disk make the build go 5.5x faster, the CPU time of csc.exe goes way down. I don’t know how the VMWare shared folder is implemented. It appears as a mapped drive to a UNC name to Windows but it is very slow. Moral of the story is just don’t host your source code on the host machine with VMWare. The performance penalty is just not worth it. If you need to share the source code tree inside the VM with the host OS, create a file share from the VM to the host over a host-only adapter.

 

Update

I can confirm this is still a problem in VMWare Fusion 6. I’m hoping maybe the new SMB implementation in Mavericks might greatly improve the performance of sharing source code from the host OS to the VM.

Update

I just updated my virtual machine to Windows Server 2012 R2 (aka Windows 8.1 server). It is running on VMWare Fusion 6. The build time of this large project is now 15 seconds over VMWare Shared Folders. Significant remaining issue is that Visual Studio uses a whole core of CPU to do nothing — just having a large solution open, not editing anything.

How to Create an Xcode 4.0-style Window-based Application in Xcode 4.2

I’ve decided to get up to speed on iOS programming and, to help me with that, I bought Aaron Hillegass’s iOS Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guid 2nd edition. I’ve listened to Aaron on podcasts and have heard that his training method is fantastic. The book does seem to be unusually well written for a tech book but the problem I immediately ran into is that it was written for Xcode 4.0 and iOS 4.3 SDK. I have Lion with Xcode 4.2 and iOS 5 SDK. That’s part of the adventure of discovery and change in tech but unfortunately Apple removed the project type that Hillegass’s examples are based on which is a major stumbling block.

Hillegass uses the “Window-based Application” template for iOS as the basis for all of his projects. That template no longer exists in Xcode. The closest thing in Xcode 4.2 is “Empty Application”. However, that’s not quite the same thing because the now-defunct “Window-based Application” template generated a main window XIB view wired to generated controller but the “Empty Application” has no XIB. In order to make any sense out of the book, you have to create the XIB and wire it up yourself. This is no big deal to anybody with a little experience but to a newb like me, it took a bit of wandering in the wilderness at the Big Nerd Ranch forums to figure out how to manually get the project into the state that the exercises in the book will work.

How to Convert a new “Empty Application” into a “Window-based Application”

Start by creating a new iOS Application project using the “Empty Application” project. This will create a very similar project to the “Window-based Application” project described in iOS Programming 2/e with just a few differences:

  1. The main controller class that gets generated is “AppDelegate” rather than “<project-name>AppDelegate”. The
  2. There is no XIB view.
  3. The window property of AppDelegate doesn’t have the IBOutlet macro to make it visible to the Interface Builder tooling.
    1. Prepare the controller to talk to the Interface Builder tooling

    In the controller class interface definition of the we need to add the IBOutlet macro so that the tooling will recognize the controller. In your controller header file, AppDelegate.h, the line to modify begins with @property and ends with *window. Add IBOutlet in front of the UIWindow type as shown below.

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface AppDelegate : UIResponder <UIApplicationDelegate>

@property (strong, nonatomic) IBOutlet UIWindow *window;

@end

Save this change.

Update the didFinishLaunchingWithOptions: method

The auto-generated first line of code in the didFinishLaunchingWithOptions: method of AppDelegate.m prevents message routing from working properly. Comment it out as below:

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
    //self.window = [[[UIWindow alloc] initWithFrame:[[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds]] autorelease];
    // Override point for customization after application launch.
    self.window.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];
    [self.window makeKeyAndVisible];
    return YES;
}

Save this change.

Create the XIB file

Right-click on the folder containing your AppDelegate files and choose “Add File”. Select “Window” from the iOS User Interface group. Choose the appropriate device family—for the initial Quiz project that is iPhone. The default file name is Window.xib which works fine or you can name it MainWindow.xib to make it just like in the book.

OS X 10.7 (Lion)-2011-11-23-11-18-56

Change the Class of the XIB file’s owner to UIApplication

Select Window.xib in the Navigator. Select the “File’s Owner” cube in the objects pane just left of the layout canvas and change the Class in the properties pane to UIApplication.

OS X 10.7 (Lion)-2011-11-23-11-34-47

 

Add an object for the controller

Filter the tool pallet on the bottom right to “Objects and Controllers” and drag and drop an Object from the toolbox onto the object pane.

OS X 10.7 (Lion)-2011-11-23-11-37-52

Set the class of the controller object

In the properties window, change the class to controller that was generated for your project by the template. That should be AppDelegate. The Object will automatically be renamed with a space added into the Pascal casing. (You can override this by putting something into the Label field of the Identity pane.)

OS X 10.7 (Lion)-2011-11-23-11-45-00

Route the XIB delegate to the controller

Now we want to wire up the MVC message routing for the view. Select the “File’s Owner” cube in the object pane and control+drag the delegate outlet to the App Delegate object.

OS X 10.7 (Lion)-2011-11-23-12-00-15

 

Route the controller object’s window outlet to the window object

Next perform a similar ctrl+drag of the window outlet from the App Delegate object to the Window object.

OS X 10.7 (Lion)-2011-11-23-12-01-08

All done

Now our Empty Application project is set up just like a Window-based Application as described in iOS Programming 2nd Edition. The file names may be a bit different but that should have no practical  effect. The AppDelegate inherits from UIResponder <UIApplicationDelegate> rather than NSObject<UIApplicationDelegate>. This doesn’t seem to be a problem, either.

Now that I have figured out how to create an wire up a main window XIB file, everything seems to work great as I follow along in the book.

Really Least-Privilege Development: AppLocker and Visual Studio

AppLocker is a software execution policy tool in Windows 7 Enterprise and Ultimate and Windows Server 2008 R2. An AppLocker policy can be used to shift Windows from a  model where execution of code is permitted by default to a model where execution is denied by default. AppLocker is aware of binary exe, DLL/OCX, the scripting engines that ship with Windows and Windows Installer packages. The default rule sets for these categories will only allow code that is installed into the system or program files directories to execute. Once AppLocker is turned on, execution of code is denied by default and an unprivileged user cannot add executable code to the system.

If untrusted users can’t execute new code, then how can Visual Studio possibly work without making developers admin?

Grant Execute on Source/Build Tree: Fail

I thought this would be super simple and that all I would have to do was create Executable, DLL and Script path rules to grant execute on my source tree. At first, it seemed to work and I was off and running. Then I tried to build a big complicated project and the build failed all of a sudden. This solution had post-build rules but so what? I had script enabled for the build tree.

Build Actions Fail

Procmon shows that the pre- and post-build events are implemented as temporary batch scripts in %TEMP%. They are named <cryptic-number>.exec.cmd.

procmon-postbuild

Unfortunately %TEMP% is not a usable macro in AppLocker. You have to either create a generic Script rule to allow all *.exec.cmd scripts to execute or create rules for each Visual Studio user like C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Temp\*.exec.cmd. Either way, post-build actions will start to work.

Web Apps Crash with Yellow Screen of Death

Another issue is that running Web apps with the built-in Visual Studio Development Web Server (aka Cassini) fails miserably. The obvious clue that this is AppLocker is “The program was blocked by group policy.”

webdev.webserver20-yellowdeath

The problem is that Cassini copies the DLLs and runs them from a subdirectory of %TEMP%\Temporary ASP.NET Files\.

webdev.webserver20-temp

 

In order for Cassini to work, you have to disable DLL rules or  create a DLL allow path rule for every developer in the form C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Temp\Temporary ASP.NET Files\*.dll.

Visual Studio’s HelpLibAgent.exe Crashes

This one is a bit weirder and more surprising. Visual Studio 2010 has a new help system that operates as a local HTTP server. Invoking help with AppLocker DLL rules enabled generates a serious crash.

helplibagent-crash

I’m not sure why it does this but HelpLibAgent.exe generates a random string and then two .cs files based on that string and invokes the C# compiler to generate a DLL based on the random string which is dynamically loaded by HelpLibAgent. This seems weird on the face of it that and there’s nothing in that code that looks like it has to be generated on a per-user basis at all. Weird, weird, weird.

helplibagent-dll-compile

In order for this to work you have to allow any randomly named dll to load out of %TEMP% which means disabling DLL rules or modifying the rule that was necessary for Cassini:

C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Temp\*.dll.

Summary

In order to run Visual Studio with AppLocker a user needs the following rules:

  • DLL, EXE and Script: Allow path on source tree / build directory structure
  • Script: Allow path on %TEMP%\*.cmd.exec
  • DLL: Allow path on %TEMP%\*.dll
  • Unfortunately %TEMP% is not available in AppLocker so a C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\Temp\* for every <username> needed has to exist. These are probably best implemented as local policies.
  • Optional: Allow script *.ps1. (This is pretty safe because PowerShell has its own tight script execution security model.)
  • It’s unfortunate that DLL rules have to be enabled for a well-known location like %TEMP% but that still doesn’t make the DLL rule useless.

    • OCX is still not permitted from %TEMP%
    • AppLocker DLL rules are complementary to CWDIllegalInDllSearch for mitigating DLL Hijacking because it provides a more granular options. This is particularly important if you need to use a global CWDIllegalInDllSearch setting of 1 or 2 for compatibility reasons.
    Once these rules are in place, the experience is seamless. The rules don’t get in the way of anything.
    Note that AppLocker script rules only apply to the scripting hosts that ship with Windows: CMD, Windows Scripting Host (.vbs and .js) and PowerShell). Perl, Python, Ruby, etc interpreters are not affected by AppLocker policy. Similarly, execution of Java jar files are not affected by AppLocker.
    It would be nice if DLL rules were a little smarter. For instance, I would like to be able to allow managed DLLs on some path but not native code.

Java Browser Plugin for Mozilla Vulnerable to DLL Preloading Attack

chrome-java-bonkThe “Next Generation Java Plug-in 1.6.0_21 for Mozilla browsers” 32-bit version for Windows uses CWD to load its C runtime library (msvcr71.dll). If you have globally disabled loading libraries from the current working directory (CWD) by globally setting CWDIllegalInDllSearch to 0xfffffff, you will get a bonk like the one shown at the right. Firefox also fails to load the JVM but it doesn’t give any feedback about why it isn’t working.

Note that this is not a general problem with Java. Java desktop applications like Eclipse work and the Java ActiveX plugin for IE works. The problem is specific to the NSAPI plugin and this indicates that the Java plugin for Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox is one of the applications that is vulnerable to a DLL preloading luring attack. Specifically, when a Java applet is loaded, the JVM will cause the browser to load msvcr71.dll from whatever is the current working directory for the browser.

The error can be fixed by dialing back your global CWDIllegalInDllSearch to 2 or create an exception for chrome and firefox. However, I would rather not open those programs to attack from a USB drive.

The first location that Windows uses to search for a DLL is the directory containing the binary executable. Placing a copy of msvcr71.dll in the same directory with Firefox and Chrome fixes the problem. The problem with that is if Java services the msvcr71.dll with a newer version, then Chrome and Firefox will cause the JRE to load the wrong C runtime causing bad things to maybe happen. Another option is to create a symbolic link (which requires Vista or later).

Incidentally, the mklink command is not a standalone utility, it is a built-in to the cmd.exe shell. If you want to use mklink via powershell, you need a function to invoke cmd.exe.

function mklink { & "$env:systemroot\system32\cmd.exe" /c mklink $args }

Running mklink requires Administrator privilege.

PS> cd C:\Users\breiter\appdata\Local\Google\Chrome\Application
PS> mklink msvcr71.dll 'C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre6\bin\msvcr71.dll'
symbolic link created for msvcr71.dll <<===>> C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre6\bin\msvcr71.dll
PS> cd 'C:\users\breiter\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome SxS\Application'
PS> mklink msvcr71.dll 'C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre6\bin\msvcr71.dll'
symbolic link created for msvcr71.dll <<===>> C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre6\bin\msvcr71.dll
PS> cd 'C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox'
PS> mklink msvcr71.dll 'C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre6\bin\msvcr71.dll'
symbolic link created for msvcr71.dll <<===>> C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre6\bin\msvcr71.dll
PS>

With the symlink fix in place, the Java version test page loads correctly in Chrome with no bonks with loading libraries from CWD disabled.

chrome-java-crt-symlink

Microsoft Should Formally Deprecate CWD from LoadLibrary Search

Microsoft recently released security security advisory 2269637, “Insecure Library Loading Could Allow Remote Code Execution”. The gist is that the search behavior of LoadLibrary() includes the current working directory, which is not the same as the directory containing the binary executable. Typically the current working directory (CWD) is set at launch time by Windows shell shortcut (LNK) or implicitly by invoking a document with a file association. The CWD can be anywhere on a supported local or remote file system, including Windows network (SMB/CIFS) shares and WebDAV.

Most applications must load code from libraries (DLLs) in order to run. The CWD is not a trusted secure location like Program Files or System32 but for reasons of backwards compatibility with pre-Windows NT forms of Windows, CWD is searched when loading DLLs. This makes the default behavior of LoadLibrary() dangerous and many, many Windows applications are vulnerable to luring attacks as a result.

Sample Luring Attack Scenario

  • Click on a link to an MP3 in an email or web page
  • File association causes popular MP3 player to load
  • CWD is set to the remote location of the MP3 player
  • Attacker has placed a malicious DLL that the popular MP3 player loads in the same location as the MP3
  • MP3 player loads malicious DLL
  • Malicious DLL loads the real DLL so MP3 player won’t crash
  • Popular MP3 player is owned an executing evil code

    Unfortunate Default Behavior

    Your application doesn’t have to search CWD but it is the default for reasons of backwards compatibility. Developers can turn this behavior off but it is the default and you a) have to know that you need to turn it off and b) know how to turn it off.

Patch Optionally Introduces New Behavior

KB2264107 is a patch that allows you to set registry keys to change the circumstances under which CWD is considered. The simplest option is to create a new DWORD value of the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager key called CWDIllegalInDllSearch and set it to 0xffffffff. chrome-load-dll-cwd-errorThis globally disables the use of CWD for loading libraries.

My first thought was this would be fine. I’m running Windows 7 x64 with no legacy 16-bit apps. It should work fine and for me it did. The second computer I tried this on had a problem where Google Chrome 5 was unable to find avutil-50.dll. Chrome keeps its DLLs in a version-numbered subdirectory of the one containing Chrome.exe. This isn’t a part of the normal DLL search path and it seems like Chrome 5 is working around this by setting CWD to the directory which contains the DLLs before calling LoadLibrary(). Chrome 6 beta doesn’t do this which is why I didn’t notice the problem.

To fix this you can either dial the global CWDIllegalInDllSearch down to 2 which indicates CWD is allowed to be searched only if it is a local folder. Better, is to create a KEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Image File Execution Options\chrome.exe key with a CWDIllegalInDllSearch DWORD value of 2 (and remember to delete this when Chrome 6 goes stable).

I had a similar problem with the Apple Update program failing when it tried to install the latest version of QuickTime.

Developers Should Disable Loading DLLs from CWD

depI was really stunned to realize that Chrome was using this CWD load behavior. They probably didn’t realize the implications and it is insidious because it is the default. I think all developers and testers should install KB2264107 and globally disable loading from CWD. (Yes this is a PITA and it might break stuff on your box but you can suck it up and white list apps that are broken.) If your apps are broken by this then you need to fix them.

Microsoft should encourage this by formally deprecating loading DLLs from CWD with Windows 7 SP1. They need to roll it out like they did DEP. There needs to be Group Policy settings and a GUI for manipulating these registry keys along the lines of the DEP compatibility with radio buttons like “Turn on loading libraries from CWD” and “Turn off loading libraries from CWD except for those I select". With Windows 7 SP1, the default is to leave CWD turned on. By the time Windows 8 rolls around, the default is to disable CWD.

KB2264107 is Insufficient

The hotfix should probably actually provide some protection by globally disabling some form of CWD loading. Right now all it does is create the potential for you to make some registry changes which is definitely not OK for the average user. At a minimum they need to disable CWD over WebDAV (CWDIllegalInDllSearch=1) and probably all network shares (CWDIllegalInDllSearch=2). I’m curious why there is no setting to disable CWD on removable media like USB keys without cranking CWDIllegalInDllSearch all the way to 0xffffffff and disabling CWD globally.

Microsoft needs to provide a GUI and a Group Policy for managing the keys for disabling loading libraries from CWD. The Group Policy option is critical for Enterprise so that they can keep legacy apps running which can’t be modified. They also need to make it clear that loading from CWD is going to be deprecated very soon and will no longer be the default behavior in the next version of Windows.

Microsoft should also provide guidance that any app which depends on loading libraries from CWD is vulnerable. In particular, legacy line of business apps which cannot be made to run without loading libraries from CWD should not be allowed to run on a computer with network access because such apps will be juicy targets for spear phishing. In a lot of cases it should be possible to fix apps that load libraries from CWD by just moving the DLLs into the same directory as the EXE. If the app can’t be fixed, it needs to be sandboxed from the network.

Switch between named SQL Server instances without changing the connection string

SQL Server allows installing multiple copies and multiple versions on the same machine as “named instances”. These are accessed locally with the name “(local)\<instance>” or “.\<instance>” or “localhost\<instance>” where <instance> is the name of the named instance. You can also install exactly one server as the “default” instance which doesn’t require a name. You just connect to (local).

If you want to switch your app between these, you have to change the connection string to the different instance names. It also means that everyone on your team has to use the same instance names or go through some other contortions to isolate the configuration file from source control.

If you aren’t using a default instance, you can make one of the named instances respond to the syntax of a default instance in a connection string. The trick is to use the SQL Configuration Manager to enable TCP/IP on one of your named instances and further configure that instance to accept connections on TCP port 1433.

When you want to switch between instances, you change which of your SQL Server named instances is listening on TCP 1433.

sql-config-mgr

Raymond Chen answers my question

Nearly four years ago, I asked Raymond Chen why Microsoft has continued to use cryptic 8.3 filenames in Windows even though long filenames have been supported for many years. I wasn’t paying attention when Raymond answered me a year later. I just stumbled across this today.

Commenter Brian Reiter asks a duplicate of a question that was already submitted to the Suggestion Box: Darren asks why operating system† files still (for the most part) adhere to the old 8.3 naming convention.

It comes down to a handful of interesting reasons:

  1. Once a name is chosen, it can’t be changed for reasons of backwards compatibility with applications that may load a system DLL or invoke a system executable.
  2. By default all long file names are given a short file name. Loading a DLL by reference to a short and long file name into a program will yield two separate references of the DLL in memory.
  3. 8.3 filenames are know to work. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Also, a related point here is that the system component installer technology in Windows XP and prior could only support 8.3 filenames. Pretty much any system component developed prior to Vista had to have 8.3 filenames. That includes some components developed for Vista while the new installer system was under development. (There a

My original question was why does the Framework Design Guidelines for .NET applications specify a totally different naming. The gist is that while native code and legacy components have the gotchas above, .NET assemblies are different because they have additional metadata including version number and public key token. In order to dynamically load an assembly, you either need to know its strong name or its full path and filename. There is very little chance of accidentally loading the wrong assembly unless you are the one building and signing the assemblies in question.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 86 other followers

%d bloggers like this: