Using Chrome with Tor on OS X

I’m living and traveling overseas. I want to have Tor as an option but I really just want to use it with Chrome — which I like a lot. My goal is to have the option to avoid national firewalls in some countries which use them. I’ve generally used SOCKS proxy over SSH in the past but it is good to have options. Plus, I have been reading Cory Doctorow’s Homeland (sequel to Little Brother) in which Tor is a prominent plot point in Homeland like “Finux” (Linux) and “Ordo” (PGP/GPG) in Cyrptonomicon.

I realize that Chrome sends information back to Google. I am even logged into Chrome, so this procedure isn’t hiding anything from them. Perhaps Chromium would be better. I’m not sure I want to constantly build from source every few weeks because Chromium is huge. These people have packaged vanilla Chromium plus Sparkle to update it. I may look into this in future.

The simplest way to use Tor for anonymized browsing is to download and install the Tor Browser Bundle. There are some aspects of this that I don’t find ideal — mostly I want to maintain Tor as part of my UNIX environment on OS X via MacPorts. I also like to have my hands in all the moving parts to learn how they work.

$ sudo port install tor

—> Updating database of binaries: 100.0%
—> Scanning binaries for linking errors: 100.0%
—> No broken files found.

$ tor
Mar 12 12:13:42.839 [notice] Tor v0.2.3.25 (git-17c24b3118224d65) running on Darwin.
Mar 12 12:13:42.840 [notice] Tor can’t help you if you use it wrong! Learn how to be safe at https://www.torproject.org/download/download#warning
Mar 12 12:13:42.840 [notice] Configuration file “/opt/local/etc/tor/torrc” not present, using reasonable defaults.
Mar 12 12:13:42.843 [notice] We were compiled with headers from version 2.0.19-stable of Libevent, but we’re using a Libevent library that says it’s version 2.0.21-stable.
Mar 12 12:13:42.843 [notice] Initialized libevent version 2.0.21-stable using method kqueue. Good.
Mar 12 12:13:42.843 [notice] Opening Socks listener on 127.0.0.1:9050
Mar 12 12:13:42.000 [notice] Parsing GEOIP file /opt/local/share/tor/geoip.
Mar 12 12:13:42.000 [notice] This version of OpenSSL has a known-good EVP counter-mode implementation. Using it.
Mar 12 12:13:42.000 [notice] OpenSSL OpenSSL 1.0.1e 11 Feb 2013 looks like version 0.9.8m or later; I will try SSL_OP to enable renegotiation
Mar 12 12:13:43.000 [notice] Reloaded microdescriptor cache. Found 3239 descriptors.
Mar 12 12:13:43.000 [notice] We now have enough directory information to build circuits.
Mar 12 12:13:43.000 [notice] Bootstrapped 80%: Connecting to the Tor network.
Mar 12 12:13:44.000 [notice] Heartbeat: Tor’s uptime is 0:00 hours, with 1 circuits open. I’ve sent 0 kB and received 0 kB.
Mar 12 12:13:44.000 [notice] Bootstrapped 85%: Finishing handshake with first hop.
Mar 12 12:13:45.000 [notice] Bootstrapped 90%: Establishing a Tor circuit.
Mar 12 12:13:48.000 [notice] Tor has successfully opened a circuit. Looks like client functionality is working.
Mar 12 12:13:48.000 [notice] Bootstrapped 100%: Done.

Tor creates a SOCKS proxy listening on localhost 9050. My first thought was to create an OS X network Location for Tor which configures all of my network interfaces to use SOCKS on localhost 9050.

Tor location

This does work in that applications that use the OS networking stack will switch to passing their traffic to SOCKS on localhost 9050, but it isn’t necessarily good enough for anonymizing with Tor because of the DNS leaking problem. In particular, browsers — specifically Chrome — not only don’t send their DNS traffic to the SOCKS server by default which affects your anonomyzation by leaking unencrypted UDP DNS requests to your ISP but also interferes with resolving Tor services on .onion domains.

I wanted to try and use Chrome with Tor, so this presented a problem. Poking around, I discovered a Chromium design document which has the solution for forcing Chrome to send all traffic — including DNS — to a SOCKS server. It requires passing arguments to Chrome or Chromium when starting the app.

–proxy-server=”socks5://myproxy:8080
–host-resolver-rules=”MAP * 0.0.0.0 , EXCLUDE myproxy
In order to use this mechanism, you have to exit all Chrome/Chromium processes and launch a new process with the appropriate flags.
 

killall Google\ Chrome
sleep 1 # give processes a chance to exit before launching
open -a Google\ Chrome –args –proxy-server=”socks5://localhost:9050″ –host-resolver-rules=”MAP * 0.0.0.0, EXCLUDE localhost”

A nifty feature of OS X is Automator, which can turn a script into an app via the Application document type. Start Automator and create a new Application document and add the “run a shell script” Action and paste in the script above. Automator will then allow you to save a .app file which can live in your Applications folder.

Screen Shot 2013 03 12 at 11 23 27 AM

I saved this automation as “Google Chrome for Tor.app”. Launching “Google Chrome for Tor” will close all my sessions in Chrome and launch a new Chrome process tree configured as a SOCKS client on my local Tor proxy. Using the chrome://net-internals URL verifies that Chrome is talking to Tor and also sending all of its DNS requests through Tor.

Screen Shot 2013 03 12 at 11 40 24 AMScreen Shot 2013 03 12 at 11 40 24 AM

Also, as an aside and note to self. SSH can be used with Tor via netcat. This means that the SSH tunnel passes through the Tor network and is useful if ssh over TCP 22 is blocked or monitored. It is bloody slow over my — relatively slow-ish, high-ish latency connection in Africa — it reminds me of SSH over GPRS.

 

 

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